Adapting to print PLGA

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bvm5207
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Adapting to print PLGA

Postby bvm5207 » Thu May 29, 2014 1:51 pm

I am working with my PI about buying a 3d printer, but he wants to be able to print poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). It is not commercially available in a filament spool, but we can make it in the lab. Is it possible to adapt the Rostock MAX v2 3D Printer and it's nozzle to be able to print PLGA?

Thanks,
Brian

Polygonhell
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Re: Adapting to print PLGA

Postby Polygonhell » Thu May 29, 2014 2:24 pm

Based entirely on what the Wikipedia page says, if it's not too soft when solid and if you can extrude it into filament, probably...
My question is what are you using it for? If it's supposed to be food safe, then you really don't want to use any FDM printer, the little ridges hold bacteria.

bvm5207
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Re: Adapting to print PLGA

Postby bvm5207 » Sat May 31, 2014 1:18 am

PLGA has very similar viscosity and melting point to PLA so I expect it to be theoretically possible to be printed. My concern was being available to make it into a filament and making it available to the nozzle to run smoothly.

The plan is to use this printer for research of bioprinted scaffolds or implants for the body. Bacteria wouldn't be too much of a problem; if we are going to perform cell culture we could clean the object.

Thanks for the reply,
Brian

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lordbinky
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Re: Adapting to print PLGA

Postby lordbinky » Sat May 31, 2014 1:52 am

Sounds really neat. Keep in mind, depending on the scale you plan on printing you can get very fine layers ( 20-50 micron layers have been achieved). With FDM you typically squish the material coming out between the surface area of the nozzle and the previous layer (or bed) so you get a wider trace as your layer size decreases. This trace width varies between the bore hole size and the width of the nozzle surface. Using smaller bore hole nozzles does compensate for this some, but you may need to figure out special nozzle design depending on what you are trying to achieve if you desire fine X/Y detail and small layers when designing scaffolding, I imagine implant design is less likely to run into necessitating both feature types.

bvm5207
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Re: Adapting to print PLGA

Postby bvm5207 » Tue Jun 03, 2014 11:21 pm

Very interesting. We are also intriuged by the potential to print microdevices (either fluid or mechanical in nature) with biodegradable PLGA on the surface, so fine layers of 20-50um would be desirable.
I will keep the trace width and bore hole size in mind when contemplating fine details in all 3 axis.

Thanks for the tips.
Brian

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Generic Default
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Re: Adapting to print PLGA

Postby Generic Default » Sat Jun 28, 2014 2:52 am

I can make you custom nozzles if you need them. I print with a 0.25 nozzle at layers typically less than 100 microns. I've done a few 20 micron prints, but they take too long for big stuff. If you are microprinting you should get 400 step/rev steppers for higher resolution and upgrade to magnetic ball arms.
Check out the Tri hotend!

erickramce
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Re: Adapting to print PLGA

Postby erickramce » Mon Oct 24, 2016 1:56 pm

Hi everyone!

Have someone successfully printed with PLGA? Did you extrude the filament or where did you buy it?

I wish you can help me!

Regards


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