My machines

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DeltaCon
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Re: My machines

Postby DeltaCon » Wed May 11, 2016 6:43 am

barry99705 wrote:Heh, "The internet is down!"

Really? You are the first to call in a problem that affects half of worlds population...
Buy a lottery ticket instead of making a support ticket! :idea:
I am DeltaCon, I have a delta, my name is Con, I am definitely PRO delta! ;-)
Rostock V2 / E3D V6 / Raymond Style Heatchamber on the way!

PS.: Sorry for the avatar, that's my other hobby!

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Xenocrates
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Re: My machines

Postby Xenocrates » Mon May 16, 2016 12:57 pm

Ah, progress. We've got the paneldue in and booting, the Duet is expected today, and we've designed a drop in mount for it with space for two fans that we have on hand. Should go where the rambo was fairly flawlessly (Other than being longer). We're fighting with the paneldue mount. We want to retain some of the look of the stock panel, we want to keep the thumbscrews accessible. But we don't have a whole lot of room to work with, especially if we want keystones to connect to the duet. I plan to put both a USB and an rj45 keystone on the left side behind the panel, and a slot to connect micro USB to the panel due on the right side. That should give us all the connections we need, with only the re-flashing connection not having an intermediary to relieve stress.

Once some of this stuff translates from cad files and ideas into working systems, we'll have pictures for you all. Unfortunately, the PT100 breakout is not expected for at least 2 days, and potentially longer (Darn you, flea bay, darn you to heck), so we will likely be testing and doing initial calibration with the stock hotend, now modified (Threaded thermistor and cartridge heater, yay). We also plan to clean the wiring up a bit more, potentially by sleeving the stepper cables and wrapping the power cables. We picked up some nice adhesive tie points, as well as cable clamps, so we may use those.
Machines:
Rostock Max V2, Duet .8.5, PT100 enabled E3D V6 and volcano, Raymond style enclosure
Automation Technology 60W laser cutter/engraver
1m X-carve router

Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
01-10011-11111100001

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Xenocrates
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Re: My machines

Postby Xenocrates » Tue May 24, 2016 1:15 pm

Two steps forwards, one step back, and two to the side. As noted elsewhere, the Duet died due to a short in one of the crimp shells of the harness, which has since been replaced (Not a fan of the unfused fan connections, especially since it killed the Duet). I've since gotten a replacement, made the mount (And tested it). For those that are interested, I have both an STL and DXF/SVG formats available. I also ordered the proper connectors for the Duet, and female receptacles for the old wiring harness, and an actual crimping tool. Included in this was a pile of something called reset-able fuses, which are actually kinda similar to the thermistors used for inrush protection, but undergo a phase change reaction that causes a massive resistance spike causing current to drop to a trickle, and most of the remaining voltage drop is left to keep the fuse in the tripped state. They are supposedly very quick to act.

I've been making wiring harness adapters using 24awg stranded copper wiring from old Cat5 cabling (Cat 5E and cat 6 make up most of the actual network cabling in use, so the spool of cat5 is less useful than it could be), and for the most part it's simple. The complication comes on the fan headers, where I've added a 1.1A fuse to each one in line (It's crimped into the Vin connector, and soldered to the wire). I've also gone ahead and decided to fuse the bed and hotend similarly (14A and 4A respectively). I should have pictures soon enough. I also went about cleaning up the wiring inside the base of the printer, and I'm adding a 20AWG shielded twisted pair cable for the PT100 to connect to the digital breakout (I am aware that it's odd for me to have a higher amperage wire for a sensor than for handling power to the steppers, however the larger wire will have lower resistance, giving me more accuracy, which is the whole point of working with a digital breakout board in the first place.) It does look like I'll be adding a new terminal block up top soon, so that I can have a spot for the original thermistor cabling to connect to, so that I can use the stock hotend without messing with the wiring beyond plugging it in. I haven't started working on a Paneldue mount yet, but I've decided I want a USB and RJ45 Keystone on the left side of it, and a slot to access the Paneldue's micro USB connection on the right. I may also toss in a slot for the SD card reader on the top (Since the 4.3 IN screen has it), although I do know it's useless as yet. I expect that eventually we may be able to use it. Perhaps the Duet NG will have support for two SD cards at once. You never know.

I do not have FSR's yet, nor will I be installing them for a while (I have had 10 day change freezes and a 60 hold period after these upgrades wrapped up imposed on me)

Things have been slow recently though, as I've been dealing with school things (I have now officially graduated from college and highschool, in that order (the graduation ceremonies were 90 minutes apart)), as well as preparations for our major gaming convention in a few weeks (We ended up with a couple 32 player tournaments we didn't expect at the last minute, in addition to our other games, so it was a bit of a rush). If you're in the Columbus (Ohio) area, or are interested in Warhammer 40K, Malifaux, Age of Sigmar, X-wing, Dropzone or Dropfleet Commander (We will have models and rules for Dropfleet there, although they likely won't be the Kickstarter models, as we won't have them in time to paint them for it (By the way, Hawk Wargames is awesome about stuff like that, and have some really cool 3D printed prototype bases for their ships)), or pretty much any other miniatures wargame, or really any game at all, stop by Origins Game fair. It's run by GAMA, and we will be there with an assortment of terrain and miniatures.

If you guys have any questions, suggestions, or specific things you want pictures of, let me know. As I said, I'll try to add pictures soon.
Machines:
Rostock Max V2, Duet .8.5, PT100 enabled E3D V6 and volcano, Raymond style enclosure
Automation Technology 60W laser cutter/engraver
1m X-carve router

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Windshadow
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Re: My machines

Postby Windshadow » Tue May 24, 2016 4:12 pm

Congratulations on your dual graduation! well done!

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Span24
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Re: My machines

Postby Span24 » Sat Jun 04, 2016 10:17 am

Xenocrates wrote:Things have been slow recently though, as I've been dealing with school things (I have now officially graduated from college and highschool, in that order (the graduation ceremonies were 90 minutes apart)), as well as preparations for our major gaming convention in a few weeks (We ended up with a couple 32 player tournaments we didn't expect at the last minute, in addition to our other games, so it was a bit of a rush). If you're in the Columbus (Ohio) area, or are interested in Warhammer 40K, Malifaux, Age of Sigmar, X-wing, Dropzone or Dropfleet Commander (We will have models and rules for Dropfleet there, although they likely won't be the Kickstarter models, as we won't have them in time to paint them for it (By the way, Hawk Wargames is awesome about stuff like that, and have some really cool 3D printed prototype bases for their ships)), or pretty much any other miniatures wargame, or really any game at all, stop by Origins Game fair. It's run by GAMA, and we will be there with an assortment of terrain and miniatures.


BWAHAHAHAHAHA! For a second there, I had to check to make sure the signature wasn't either of my two sons!

BTW: Nice work with the nested parens, although I don't think that the phpBB message board recognizes the formula! :P I know, habits and all... :lol:

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Rostock MAX V2 (x2)

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Eaglezsoar
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Re: My machines

Postby Eaglezsoar » Sat Jun 04, 2016 10:26 am

Xenocrates, congrats on your graduations! I am always interested in pictures, if you have the time.
I would like the STL also but it would need to be posted here because I had to close my private messaging do to reasons I would not want to discuss on an open board.
My email is eagle25s@yahoo.com if you ever need to communicate privately. Thanks!
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Xenocrates
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Re: My machines

Postby Xenocrates » Sat Jun 04, 2016 12:05 pm

So, things are very busy here, but I have the printer working at least vaguely again. Kinematics are calibrated, everything talks nice to the other components (Although I do want to set up a little ethernet/wifi hotspot for the Duet to work with). I have the resistors to calibrate the ADCs with, So I'll be doing that shortly after our upcoming convention.
The printer as it stands:
Spoiler:
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I also have a mock-up of a 4.3 IN paneldue mount that should mate to the original front panel location (And the original front panel for other people. I cut a hole in mine a while ago so I'm replacing it). That you can see below. Mocked up with cardboard and graph paper. Will be made with either mellamine or baltic birch, and acyrlic. I'm not bothering with strip bending or laser cut hinges, so it's more faceted and sharp looking, as well as being rather a bit more bulky (But it shouldn't have any issues with enclosure doors or anything). It has two slots for keystones, one cat 5/6 standard one, and one for a USB keystone I bought a while ago and cut down somewhat. It will also have a little cutout to get down to the paneldue reset button, and likely when we make the final version, a laser cut spar that goes behind the paneldue and panel to support them.
Spoiler:
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In addition, since we were ordering the resistors from mouser, and the shipping cost more than they did even with 10 units, we picked up a bit of a haul. 25A 12V coil relays, DPST, for a safety cutout on the bed, and a 24V coil DPDT 15A relay for auto-switchover of the eventual 24V external power supply, as well as IEC sockets and switches (Separate, as the combined unit price for 10A parts is really annoyingly high), 141C thermal cutouts (for the bed again. We got 10, so if one trips we'll be fine and able to replace it). That's been combined with our previous orders of connectors into the shipping boxes they sent, for temporary storage, alongside some other parts. You can take a look at those below.

Spoiler:
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For those paying attention, I'm still working on a way to have the controller handle the chamber as well as the bed. Duet seems to have some support for this. (They have a set chamber temp G code, but not a huge amount of documentation). I went ahead and used the heatsink off an old ISA card and a screw in thermistor to make a sensor, and will connect it eventually (Since I use PT100's I thankfully can use some thermistor jacks for that). That's a relatively low priority. I already have a relay that can drive the heater bulbs, and both are in place. There's a few pictures of all that below.

Spoiler:
Image
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And finally, the wiring. I cleaned it up and color coded a lot of it (The steppers and their leads all have the coding on them now, including the little extensions). I also put in fuses on the fan, hotend, and bed connections (They are inline resettable PPTC fuses for those who haven't heard by now). I also pulled about 4 linear meters of wiring out of the printer. I forgot to take any pictures of that while I was working, so you'll have to imagine it.

And Eagle, you can find the STL for the mount on repables here: http://repables.com/r/760/

Thanks for the interest folks.
Machines:
Rostock Max V2, Duet .8.5, PT100 enabled E3D V6 and volcano, Raymond style enclosure
Automation Technology 60W laser cutter/engraver
1m X-carve router

Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
01-10011-11111100001

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Xenocrates
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Re: My machines

Postby Xenocrates » Mon Jul 04, 2016 12:02 pm

I've got the thing working again. I found that what I thought was a complex issue wasn't (my hotend was taking far too long to get to temperature, rather than it being a problem with the temp sensor, because at some point in my rather dragged out migration, I either assumed the default PID would work, or thought I tuned it.). I have very stable hotend temperatures now (±.3C), and while the bed takes a while to get up to temperature, I'm pretty sure I can A) cut the temperature down somewhat, B) reduce the temperature gradient when I install a chamber temperature sensor and connect my heaters to it (Duet apparently has the firmware set up to allow one to be defined with M141, and there are chamber specific commands, so I plan to make use of them. I wonder if the Paneldue supports a chamber temperature readout?), C), actually carry through on my plans and add a 24V PSU to supply the bed and possibly the other components if I can figure out a good way to ensure that the fans can still be 12V (I miss the Rambo for this purpose). The duet sounds a lot louder (It's a bit hard to tell, since I don't have all the panels on, and I didn't really record the old noise), but I don't care much since only the people babysitting it need to watch it, and it having an enclosure, can fairly easily be trusted not to kill anything major (Since the temperature sensor can't creep out, and even with the heater cartridge loose, it doesn't leave it's socket, I think it's pretty safe). I also want to potentially make the stock hotend accept an E3D cartridge sensor, although I suspect that it will require remaking the heater block or some other shenanigans with it.

I still need to translate my cardboard prototype for an enclosure into an actual laser cut set of parts. (I wish to maintain the stock look as much as practical. I already have that large cable duct up the side. Perhaps if I get a little CNC router I'll make a cable duct that looks better for the purpose.) I may also re-cut all the acrylic panels in red to make them match (As I have no black on hand, just bronze, and all of mine came with at least minor flaws on the bottom panels)

If any of you folks have questions/comments/suggestions, let me know. Happy Fourth for those who celebrate it, and for those who don't, let's just hope your Monday comes with a lack of unplanned explosions. Cheers.
Machines:
Rostock Max V2, Duet .8.5, PT100 enabled E3D V6 and volcano, Raymond style enclosure
Automation Technology 60W laser cutter/engraver
1m X-carve router

Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
01-10011-11111100001

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Xenocrates
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Re: My machines

Postby Xenocrates » Wed Jul 27, 2016 4:04 am

Time for yet more upgrades. Now, I have all the parts for a 24V bed on the way that aren't already on hand. This will be an external power supply, that feeds only the heated bed, with a relay based cutover. While I'm at installing that, I also plan to connect the chamber heater to the duet for control, as DC42 kindly pointed me at the correct documentation page for that. I'll also be picking up an aluminum effector plate at the maker faire. As far as I can see though, this is the penultimate set of upgrades. The laser cut paneldue mount should be prototyped tomorrow, if crudely. Once I've tested the basic dimension of the actual laser cut parts, I'll be whipping it up in black melamine and red acrylic, as well as printing vented corner panels in some lovely red glass fiber filled nylon I happen to have (I know it's a bit of a waste to use that just for panels, but I want the aesthetics and flexibility of nylon, and it to not break on me again, plus it gives me an excuse to come up with a profile for it).

Still ahead in my plans for the printer is self-calibration. Be it with FSRs, the accelormeter boards, or an IR probe, I want the thing to be able to self correct at least somewhat, especially with DC42's wonderful firmware capabilities. It would be a right shame not to make use of those. But I think that's going to wait until I have some time to mill out FSR mounts myself, as that's the solution I like best right now, for a variety of reasons. But after that, I don't see a lot of point in further shake ups in the hardware, as I already have a nice variety of features I make very little use of (The berd air and triple part fans for instance, aren't in place or triggered by the firmware as yet.). I don't think I'll be doing anything like dual extrusion, watercooling, or adding something new and experimental to it at this point. It makes a very nice workhorse for much of what I want to do, and quite honestly, I don't see a need to end up with a printer that has next to no stock parts. (I'm pretty close, other than the frame already. The belts, idlers, basic wiring, and frame are all that remain. Everything else has been altered or replaced at least once.). I might also add heatsinks to the stepper motors, but that's not a major change, nor does is it settled.

The only major other major projects that will touch the printer functionally are we're finally going to add both climate control, and a fiber connection out to the shop at some point in the next year, which will both make it more pleasant to work in there, and reduce the need to have people go out to check on it. Unfortunately, the fiber connection will be from LAN to LAN. No google fiber for us. But it should let me have an IP camera pointed at the printer with the feed embedded in DWC, and potentially live stream from it. We may also add a UPS to protect the printer from black outs. If we do, the external PSU and chamber heater won't be connected. Adding another 800W's of potential draw makes the UPS much more expensive, and cuts runtime sharply.

Let me know if you guys have any suggestions or questions as always. If you think I'm forgetting something, or think it's already overkill, go ahead and let me hear it.
Machines:
Rostock Max V2, Duet .8.5, PT100 enabled E3D V6 and volcano, Raymond style enclosure
Automation Technology 60W laser cutter/engraver
1m X-carve router

Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
01-10011-11111100001

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Re: My machines

Postby dc42 » Thu Jul 28, 2016 6:19 pm

Sounds good!

I have a comment on the UPS. The Duet WiFi has on-board power monitoring, and this was included so that we can implement suspend/resume. The idea is that you use a small UPS or SLA battery or even a capacitor bank to provide enough power to park the machine and save the current state when the power goes down, so that you can resume the print from the same point later. The UPS doesn't need to power the bed heater, chamber heater or hot end once power failure is detected, just the stepper motors and the electronics.

I plan to add manual suspend/resume on the Duet 0.8.5 as well, and there is the possibility of supporting automatic suspend on the Duet 0.8.5 with the addition of a few external components to provide power monitoring.

Stepper motors shouldn't need heatsinks, unless for some reason you need to run them at or close to their rated current to get enough torque.

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Re: My machines

Postby Xenocrates » Thu Jul 28, 2016 6:38 pm

Very cool. I noticed the suspend/resume on the duet forums. Personally, I'd love to have it, but unless it has an automatic resume (Which is troublesome in and of itself, for a variety of reasons), I probably would not use the external components for my application (We have somewhat frequent flickers, but very rarely is our power down for more than 15 minutes, due to having 2 substations that can feed our circuit, and pole mounted transformer/capacitor banks out front).

I also agree on the stepper motor front (Thus why I haven't put sinks on them yet), under normal conditions. I'm wanting to cool my extruder stepper somehow to compensate for the chamber (It was one reason I was tempted to do water-cooling on the hotend, which I am somewhat reconsidering after a fan failure led to a somewhat annoying clog)
Machines:
Rostock Max V2, Duet .8.5, PT100 enabled E3D V6 and volcano, Raymond style enclosure
Automation Technology 60W laser cutter/engraver
1m X-carve router

Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
01-10011-11111100001

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Eaglezsoar
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Re: My machines

Postby Eaglezsoar » Sun Jul 31, 2016 5:19 am

knabo wrote:Forward or Aft ET? For the record I was AFT. Hope to show the progress on my printer soon. Mostly stock, but there are a few probably useless additions I have made. This thread is my prime example of how I would like mine to look. Kudos.


I was a forward ET. Glad to know that a fellow submariner is on the forum!
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Re: My machines

Postby geneb » Sun Jul 31, 2016 10:15 am

Did you....phone home? *gd&r*

:D

g.
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Xenocrates
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Re: My machines

Postby Xenocrates » Wed Aug 17, 2016 1:47 am

So....

Ignoring that absolutely terrible joke, I've managed to make some progress. I have an actual laser cut, acrylic encased HMI panel now, which is at the angle of the original one. And I must say, with red acrylic and some gold ink in the engraving, I think it looks quite sharp. Now, it's not quite ready for prime time. Biggest issue is that the front needs to be somewhat longer, so I can fit a lower nut pocket in on the left side. There are some small issues with the keystones, and I need to clear those up before I'd consider releasing the files. But you can find a few pictures below in the spoiler tag

Spoiler:
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I'd say that looks quite sharp. +5 internet points if you can identify the character that's engraved. +10 if you can read the inscription (Hint, it's not Esperanto, but nearly as unpopular in real world usage), +2 if you can from either of the two, or both, deduce what I've finally decided to name the printer.


I've also opened up the printer for some more cable management and clean up, in addition to installing the three new relays that I'm adding to the heated bed power path. Starting from closest to the Duet, we have a large 25A mechanical relay, which has the unenviable task of shutting off the power should thermal fuses under the bed blow. It gets it's own dedicated power tap from the internal PSU. Next up, we have a 15A rated DPDT relay with a 24Vdc coil that will when the external PSU comes online, switch the Duet automatically to driving the SSR that switches the 24V power, which is the next in line. But that 25A relay is also going to be switching off the 24V power if it should trip, as it has sufficient capacity, and two contacts. That means that even if the SSR fails, the bed can't go into thermal run-away.

Spoiler:
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As you can see above, there is some planning here. Those familiar with industrial electronics, pneumatics, and hydraulics should recognize the above as ladder logic. For those that don't, it's pretty simple and valuable to understand, so I'd suggest you go look at it.

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As you can see, three very different relays, each with different numbers of contacts. Makes it pretty easy to keep straight. Two shouldn't cycle under load very often, which means high lifespans for the mechanical ones, and if that turns out to not be the case, I have learned to keep spares.


I've gone ahead and built the external PSU into a fairly user-friendly unit. I'm using a Meanwell SE-600-24V supply, with nice thick silicone jacketed wire coming off it and going to Powerpole 30A contacts and connectors in blue and white to differntiate from the 12V and 5V that may be turning up in the printer. I've decided that the hotends at least are getting power pole connectors. So light and convenient, it's hard to say no. I went ahead and tossed a IEC connector onto the input side, as well as a switch, so it's easy to work with. The venting isn't compromised by the endcaps, but they completely isolate any live contacts. I haven't hooked up the remote sense or anything, but as the endcaps are slip on/off (Using a bit of tape to compensate for it not being completely close), if that's needed I can.

Spoiler:
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Beyond that, cable management is the bear to wrestle now. I want more air-flow through the base, and less random crud. I can fairly quickly reduce the amount of wiring in there, especially if I pull the contacts I don't need out of the modular supply cables. Since I can re-use this one with the hot spare, and return it for warranty work with the hot spare's cables, I'm unconcerned by the pulling every cable I don't need, and as I can do it at actual contacts rather than cutting and capping wires, I'm perfectly happy to do it, and the tool to do it right arrives tomorrow.

Few last things in this update. I went ahead and ordered a Volcano PT100 block, and the other parts to make my volcano nozzles into a fully fledged hotend. We also think we tracked down the issue with our Rambo board to a busted reset switch (Both audible and multimeter observations tell us it never opens properly), which we've thinking about removing. I'm also seriously considering testing a water jacket on the secondary heatsink, since I'm not planning to use it soon. If I do go for that, I'll be running trials with the pump and the rest of the loop running 24/7 in a bin for at least a week, to make sure no leaks develop. I've also reached out to Matt at 713 Maker. I have an aluminum effector platform I picked up at the maker faire, and have a quote from him for curved panels for the machine. He's also working on a quote for FSR holders for me. I'm hoping that he gets that sorted soon (I didn't exactly make it easy for him, since I didn't have a drawing or step file for precisely what I wanted, and I figure he's pretty busy lately with his gorgeous new all-metal Folgertech work, and getting the effectors ready to ship). I also asked him to consider machining a pair of flats into the stand-off end caps that you could fit a stock E3D nozzle wrench into, as I've marred one standoff, and cracked the epoxy on another by doing dumb things. That isn't to say his stuff isn't great. Quite the opposite. If I had I problem I couldn't deal with myself with his stuff, I'd happily buy from him again.

I also got a good look at Proto's V1 today. It had power when it left, and I must say, the original builder was a little bit nuts, but very capable. It's one of the few things I know of where not only is 5VSB used, but so is PWR OK. So that made for a fun bit of wiring, as we added some spade terminals in so that if there's a problem again we can get it fixed. Hopefully both his and my machines are back in service at the end of the week. I do very much like the way some of the add-on's were done, and while I like the hinged side panels, I think the more open interior space and less wiring restrictions really make the V2 more amiable to the sort of idiocy I've been doing (Did I mention I plan on mounting one of my three relays hanging from the top of the bottom compartment?. Gotta love how wonderfully crazy that space becomes, and how much good cable management opens for other parts)

While I have it open and out of service, I'm also going to be running the basic cabling to the Duet for the chamber temperature sensor and relay. Slowly but surely each portion of my monstrosity is reaching it's final stage. I suppose I should get back to work on designing it's successor, as well as either a small (Say, 8X8X8 build area) cartesian machine for multi-extrusion, or a tool changer and print head for an X carve or other CNC mill, depending on which one interests me more. Gotta have something to waste time on sketching out in the middle of class, right?
Machines:
Rostock Max V2, Duet .8.5, PT100 enabled E3D V6 and volcano, Raymond style enclosure
Automation Technology 60W laser cutter/engraver
1m X-carve router

Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
01-10011-11111100001

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Xenocrates
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Re: My machines

Postby Xenocrates » Mon Oct 31, 2016 1:12 am

Hello once again folks. I have some pretty pictures for all of you, and some more updates about the printer. It is actually in shape to print, although it's got a quirk or two.

First, a picture of the beat in it's fully assembled form.
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That's as it stands now minus one small detail. The original Bondtech mount lower portion cracked due to thermal cycle and ABS being poorly suited to the role. That roll of filament on the printer is a lovely glass filled PETG that I plan to try for the replacement, but for now there's a green one I printed in ABS again to tide me over. In front of the machine is one of the relays that switch bed power. It's meant to be a thermal safety measure, cutting power when a thermal fuse embedded in the snowflake pops, but right now it's mostly a nuisance. There's not enough voltage getting to it to switch it it seems, so that may need to be re-engineered. However, if you push the test button on it, it will shift and stick nicely, so I can actually print reasonably. Right next to it is my trusty Fluke multimeter. I've never needed the precision it offers for the printer, but a true RMS meter is a very handy tool when you're working with some of the weirder equipment (and especially UPS's and inverters). If you've got a fluke, you know how nicely they work. If you don't, you probably looked at the price point and decided it's not for you (For reference, the updated version of the 87, the 87V is 370$ new, and goes up to 420$ if you want an actual calibration cert, and is rated for 1000V isolation. It's major overkill for anything most of us do. But good tools are a bit of an obsession of mine.)

Next, the lovely parts Matt at 713Maker delivered.
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These are the carbon fiber panels I mentioned before, as well as the FSR mounts (which while I've installed them and set up the firmware, I actually haven't autocalibrated yet, although they do seem to handle printing pretty well.) There's also a set of spacers in there with slots to accomodate an E3D nozzle wrench. I've got a close up of the entire effector assembly below. It's a real beauty. These are all custom parts from him, so don't expect to see them on the order page soon. If you want a set, shoot him an Email. However, I'm given to understand he's not taking more custom work orders for a while to get caught up on the Folgertech parts. I'm also not going to say anything about pricing, other than I feel he was very generous about it.

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I'm working on some other projects too. Firstly is a watercooling adapter for the V6. I've got an actual CAD model and render for it, and a printed prototype is sitting around assembled right now. I may just do a little "what are you making post about it later". Unfortunately, I'm too time strapped to use the lathes on campus to turn a few out right now, and there doesn't seem to be a 713 maker equivalent with a lathe somewhere. I'd love to have some, but it seems that the lowest quote I'm getting right now is 125$ for two with anodizing. That's more than I want to pay, especially since I quoted it out as a job for spare time with a delivery date 6 months away. Plus I've revamped the design for my 713 maker compatible Berd air mount to use grub screws rather than a friction fit, and to have it in a sane modeling program. I'm hoping I'll get it actually printed soon to see how well it works, and then I'll likely post it.

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Beyond that, I've also gotten the Rambo we "killed" earlier working again. Turns out the reset switch on it had died somehow (Don't ask me, I don't think I ever pressed it), and that was what caused the reboot loop. We're also sizing a UPS to run the printer for at least 15 minutes, so that it can survived power flickers, and are still working out the best plan for getting the network extended out to the barn, be that directional wireless or fiber.

Hope you folks enjoyed the update. As always, any questions or comments, post away.
Machines:
Rostock Max V2, Duet .8.5, PT100 enabled E3D V6 and volcano, Raymond style enclosure
Automation Technology 60W laser cutter/engraver
1m X-carve router

Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
01-10011-11111100001

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DeltaCon
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Re: My machines

Postby DeltaCon » Mon Oct 31, 2016 11:10 am

Hmm, I was thinking about a UPS also, mainly to troubleshoot the PSU shutting down. Or mainly to deduct that it is not a flaky mains that cause it ;-) How heavy a UPS would I need to be able to give out enough power?

Nice FSR mounts btw!
I am DeltaCon, I have a delta, my name is Con, I am definitely PRO delta! ;-)
Rostock V2 / E3D V6 / Raymond Style Heatchamber on the way!

PS.: Sorry for the avatar, that's my other hobby!

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Re: My machines

Postby Xenocrates » Mon Oct 31, 2016 12:24 pm

If you're talking about the 24V supply, it is likely that you'll need ~90W+the wattage of the 24V supply (for the other stuff if those still use a 12V supply, otherwise just use the wattage of the power supply as a guideline with ~15 minutes of capacity. This should be a 600-800VA unit, with at least 200Wh. However, knowing you're in Europe, I won't make specific recomendations, since almost none of the UPS's here are designed for 220V. Be aware though that most UPS's put out a pretty crappy sine wave, so if you think it's a mains issue, go for either something like a power meter (the Kill-a-watt type devices are relatively common in the US, there should be a european equivalent), or a pure sine wave UPS (These are much more expensive than the equivalent without these functions).
Machines:
Rostock Max V2, Duet .8.5, PT100 enabled E3D V6 and volcano, Raymond style enclosure
Automation Technology 60W laser cutter/engraver
1m X-carve router

Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
01-10011-11111100001

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Re: My machines

Postby DeltaCon » Tue Nov 01, 2016 4:28 am

Thanks. I am driving the whole 12V and 24V through the same PSU through a stepdown converter. The wattage of the PSU is 600W (with a start capacity of twice that for 5 seconds). I think the Smart UPS like the one below are said to generate pure sine wave. In our IT company we have some minor experience with the cheaper ones, that cannot even get a HP server started because of the crappy sine (HP server PSU's seem te be affected by this greatly). I wonder why they even make these things... I guess the Smart-UPS 750 is a little on the low capacity or this experiment then? That's a shame, because we often have some of these laying around.
SmartUPS750.jpg
I am DeltaCon, I have a delta, my name is Con, I am definitely PRO delta! ;-)
Rostock V2 / E3D V6 / Raymond Style Heatchamber on the way!

PS.: Sorry for the avatar, that's my other hobby!

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Re: My machines

Postby morgandc » Tue Nov 01, 2016 7:53 am

That model is actually line interactive, you would only see "true sine" when the power was off.

http://www.apc.com/us/en/faqs/FA157448/

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Re: My machines

Postby DeltaCon » Tue Nov 01, 2016 8:25 am

Thanks for the info. On that APC page explaining the different type of UPS's they sell, there is no mention of the term "true sine" at all. Why is having true sine important if the usual mains equipment runs on does not provide that either?
I am DeltaCon, I have a delta, my name is Con, I am definitely PRO delta! ;-)
Rostock V2 / E3D V6 / Raymond Style Heatchamber on the way!

PS.: Sorry for the avatar, that's my other hobby!

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Re: My machines

Postby morgandc » Tue Nov 01, 2016 8:27 am

Because there are a lot of cheap UPS that use a square wave, or modified sine that can't power certain equipment while it IS in use.

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Re: My machines

Postby rurwin » Tue Nov 01, 2016 9:21 am

Way back in the day a friend of mine created a 252V battery from NiCds. It powered switched mode power supplies just fine, since the first thing they did was to rectify and smooth the mains. That was thirty odd years ago though and there may be other circuitry on the input now. Not to mention that high voltage DC is rather dangerous to play with.

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Re: My machines

Postby DeltaCon » Tue Nov 01, 2016 5:11 pm

morgandc wrote:Because there are a lot of cheap UPS that use a square wave, or modified sine that can't power certain equipment while it IS in use.

Yes I know, but if also the mains does not provide True Sine (of which my understanding is limited, hence the question) which I deducted from your phrase
morgandc wrote:That model is actually line interactive, you would only see "true sine" when the power was off.

Then why should a UPS do that? After all both mains and ups output are used to drive the same equipment? I guess a "block sine" is another deal compared to that what comes out of our wall outlets ;-)
I am DeltaCon, I have a delta, my name is Con, I am definitely PRO delta! ;-)
Rostock V2 / E3D V6 / Raymond Style Heatchamber on the way!

PS.: Sorry for the avatar, that's my other hobby!

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Re: My machines

Postby morgandc » Tue Nov 01, 2016 9:46 pm

I am running away :)

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Re: My machines

Postby Xenocrates » Tue Nov 01, 2016 10:17 pm

DeltaCon wrote:
morgandc wrote:Because there are a lot of cheap UPS that use a square wave, or modified sine that can't power certain equipment while it IS in use.

Yes I know, but if also the mains does not provide True Sine (of which my understanding is limited, hence the question) which I deducted from your phrase
morgandc wrote:That model is actually line interactive, you would only see "true sine" when the power was off.

Then why should a UPS do that? After all both mains and ups output are used to drive the same equipment? I guess a "block sine" is another deal compared to that what comes out of our wall outlets ;-)


Line interactive means that the UPS in some way modifies the current coming from the wall. In some cases, this is to avoid having to use a fast relay or MOSFET to switch from wall voltage to battery, as it will always run off the battery, which may occur in units which have charge and discharge circuitry suitable for continuous duty.

As far as true sine versus block sine, and all the other stuff:
Sine waves are smooth curves that alternate between two identical peaks and cross a zero voltage (As far as we're concerned at least). This smooth curves are hard to make with digital equipment such as you would find in a UPS, as it's a lot easier to just supply a voltage that is alternatively positive and negative (Or just a DC voltage at the RMS voltage, as was mentioned earlier). Producing even an approximation of the wave requires more precise control of the switching, as well as no end of inductors and capacitors to clean the power up, as well as no small amount of monitoring to ensure you're actually getting close. Thus Pure sine units are expensive, and for many many years largely weren't available at standard pricing.

However, modern power supplies in some increasing number of cases are becoming more intelligent, and are attempting to correct for the phase angle (Power factor, essentially), of the wall voltage, through some amount of trickery with adjustable capacitors and inductors, and other sensing. These largely assume that you're actually feeding wall voltage, AKA, a sine wave to them. Which means that easy DC voltage at the RMS voltage goes out the window, as well as severely missing on the square wave. Thus "Pure sine" UPS's came into more common use. Now, if you're experiencing reliability issues from the power supply and suspect either a brownout (Fails when load suddenly increases), or other issues with the wall voltage causing it to fail/shut down, as you mentioned, then it may be that the power factor in your area is bad (Unbalanced capacitance or inductance causing the phase angle of the power delivery to be out of whack. This is most easily measured with a power meter such as a Kill-a-watt, as I mentioned, and alternatively with an oscilloscope or a scope-meter (Not cheap, and check that they support mains voltage), or that the startup current is so large due to inductance or capacitance as to cause a momentary voltage sag that causes the unit to cut out. In the first case (Brownout), it is easy enough to check by plugging the machine into separate circuits in the house, although this may require an extension cord if there is only one circuit in a room, which I am given to understand is more common in Europe (And indeed, I've heard of some circuit designs where there are only a small number in the house, typically lighting, kitchen appliances, bathrooms and wall outlets), or by removing as much load as possible from the circuit if the printer can't be spread (As in your case). You could also use a multimeter with a hold function to check the lowest voltage across the power supply input terminals. A multimeter typically cannot measure power factor, as that requires reading the phase angle, which would require tracking current and amperage at the same time, and with a sample buffer suitable to store at least 1 cycle worth of data (It could be done with less, as you could potentially determine it from a single set of peaks, however it is more typical to use more samples to improve accuracy). Instead, dedicated meters are required unless you feel like buying a scope suited for mains voltage.




Morgan, don't worry, that's a usual response to my threads :P
Machines:
Rostock Max V2, Duet .8.5, PT100 enabled E3D V6 and volcano, Raymond style enclosure
Automation Technology 60W laser cutter/engraver
1m X-carve router

Sic Transit Gloria Mundi
01-10011-11111100001


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