mhackney's Real V3 Build Thread

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mhackney
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Re: mhackney's Real V3 Build Thread

Postby mhackney » Fri Feb 10, 2017 1:01 pm

Does the V2 use the same base plates?

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bvandiepenbos
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Re: mhackney's Real V3 Build Thread

Postby bvandiepenbos » Fri Feb 10, 2017 1:48 pm

mhackney wrote:Does the V2 use the same base plates?


No, they are a bit different. But may not make a difference to how your FSR plate mounts.
Of course the files are on github.
~*Brian V.

RostockMAX v2 (Stock)
MAX METAL "ShortyMAX"
MAX METAL Rostock MAX Printer Frame
NEMESIS Air Delta v1 & v2 -Aluminum delta printers
Rostock MAX "KITT" - Tri-Force Frame
GRABER i3 "Slim"

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Re: mhackney's Real V3 Build Thread

Postby mhackney » Fri Feb 10, 2017 2:45 pm

I meant the plates that attach to the front of the base cabinet that the 2 drawer print I made above would fit. The FSR Plate will work on all versions of Rostock MAX from V1 to V3, I've verified that already!

Sublime Layers - my blog on Musings and Experiments in 3D Printing Technology and Art

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Re: mhackney's Real V3 Build Thread

Postby bvandiepenbos » Fri Feb 10, 2017 3:09 pm

Oh, I'm not sure about that. But I think the v2 & v3 bases are different heights.
~*Brian V.

RostockMAX v2 (Stock)
MAX METAL "ShortyMAX"
MAX METAL Rostock MAX Printer Frame
NEMESIS Air Delta v1 & v2 -Aluminum delta printers
Rostock MAX "KITT" - Tri-Force Frame
GRABER i3 "Slim"

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Re: mhackney's Real V3 Build Thread

Postby Xenocrates » Fri Feb 10, 2017 3:20 pm

It's at least similar, however the issue would be just how much is in the base of a V2 (I don't even want to think about trying that on mine), I suppose that especially on the rail supply ones, that the leftward side has some space for it, but if you put an SSR and control relay in, you lose a lot of that. Even more if you also use a safety relay with thermal fuses. But a panel with just the niches for nozzles at an angle would be really nice (I am honestly tempted to do one up for the top side of mine, on the right, with 2-3 rows of say, 8 each, for all my nozzle sizes and the 3 materials I'm interested in (Would love to see the .15 in a copper nozzle, personally). I think it would fit.
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Re: mhackney's Real V3 Build Thread

Postby mhackney » Thu Feb 16, 2017 7:07 pm

Ok, I've updated all the files on TV and two members have verified the "stock V3" versions work perfectly in the stock V3 base. As an apology for bone-headedness, I created two different small drawers too. So you can choose from a simple drawer or a drawer with nozzle holders for either of the two drawers.

Sublime Layers - my blog on Musings and Experiments in 3D Printing Technology and Art

Start Here:
A Strategy for Successful (and Great) Prints

Strategies for Resolving Print Artifacts

The Eclectic Angler

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Supporting Rules

Postby mhackney » Thu Feb 16, 2017 9:16 pm

I get asked this all the time so here's a little overview on how to go about designing purpose-built supports for your models. You can also use these techniques to add supports to STL models in exactly the same way, all it takes is a CAD program that can open STL files and can generate meshes and save them as STL files.

Modeling supports is easy, all you have to do is learn to "think like a 3D printer". What I mean by this is, when you are designing your parts think about what the printer need to do to print them. Many times you'll discover other simpler options to design the part so no supports are needed. But in the cases where you have no choice but to use supports, thinking like a 3D printer will help you design them. Let me start with a few simple, what I call, Supporting Rules. First, explore all options to obviate supports. Think about reorienting the model, breaking it into several parts that can be printed without supports and then fastened together, or even rethinking the design.
  1. Ok, supports are necessary, so the first rule is to minimize the interface - the surface area - between the part and support. Less is more. Think of ways to use as little support to hold up more model. Shapes like Ts, I beams, ridges and ribs all minimize the surface area.
  2. Separate horizontal flat surfaces by 2 layer heights. So if your layers are .2mm, leave a .4mm gap between the top of the support and the surface of the model that's being supported.
  3. Separate vertical walls by at least 1 wall thickness, so for a .4mm extrusion width, keep the support .4mm away from the model.

Once you've modeled your supports, tesselate (convert to a mesh) them individually along with your model. You have two options for saving the meshes:
  1. Save all of the parts into a single STL file or
  2. Save the model in one file and the supports in one or more separate files.

The choice mostly depends on your slicer and printer. For instance, if you have dual extrusion, you might dedicate 1 extruder to support material. Most slicers will allow you to associate each extruder with separate STL files so you would use option 2 in this case. If your slicer allows you to have different slicer settings for different sub-models in the same file, you can save everything in one 1 file. Then, in your slicer you can choose "fast printing" options for the supports - like 1 or 2 perimeters, 1 shell layer and very sparse infill.

A couple of tricks I like to use is to use zig zags like the support in this photo:
FullSizeRender 9.jpg

You can either make the entire support structure the zig zag like the one in the photo or put a 1 or 2 layer hight zig zag on top of a more solid support platform in order to cut down bonding surface area.

All of the above can also be used to add support to an existing STL file. Organic shapes like figurines (Yoda!) might be more challenging so auto generated supports might be a better option. I design primarily functional and mechanical things so the "Supporting Rules" work well.

Sublime Layers - my blog on Musings and Experiments in 3D Printing Technology and Art

Start Here:
A Strategy for Successful (and Great) Prints

Strategies for Resolving Print Artifacts

The Eclectic Angler


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