heat break stuck

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kuper
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heat break stuck

Postby kuper » Thu Jul 05, 2018 6:49 am

Hello,
I have Rostock v3.2 and I have a problem during the printing.
the printing starts ok but after few layers, the heat break stuck and the filament doesn't go any further.
I have a PTFE tube inside the cool part, the nozzle is clean and the filament goes well manually.
my heat break is not the original, because it was broken.
see photos attached

https://ibb.co/dxiAMd
https://ibb.co/eXKH1d
https://ibb.co/mGxsZy
https://ibb.co/cp3S1d
https://ibb.co/iqP0Md

thanks.

kuper
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby kuper » Tue Jul 17, 2018 12:46 pm

somebody??

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Xenocrates
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby Xenocrates » Tue Jul 17, 2018 12:53 pm

I'm not personally familar with the Se300 hotend, but it seems that the heat break, at least the one you got, is rather similar to an E3D clone from amazon. Can you extract the PTFE, and see if it's warped at all, as well as checking it's length against the heatbreak itself? There is also a chance that there is a slight gap at the end, which would build up a plastic flange on the filament, and make it much more likely to jam. What filament and settings are you using?
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kuper
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby kuper » Fri Jul 20, 2018 3:31 pm

I fitted the PTFE tube in the cool part to the heat break, I think its ok.
the filament is PLA, don't know which company, but I printed well with this filament on Rostock max 2.
I'm using duet and slice with seemecnc profiles in cura.
it possible that the nozzle hole is too small and it stuck because of it?

thanks.

kuper
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby kuper » Fri Aug 03, 2018 4:41 am

somebody?

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geneb
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby geneb » Fri Aug 03, 2018 9:59 am

You might have debris in the nozzle - it wouldn't hurt to just replace it.

g.
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kuper
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby kuper » Sat Aug 04, 2018 10:26 am

geneb wrote:You might have debris in the nozzle - it wouldn't hurt to just replace it.

g.


I did it already, tried different new nozzles the result is the same.

thank.

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Re: heat break stuck

Postby geneb » Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:12 pm

"the heat break stuck" doesn't really make any sense to me. I'm assuming you're getting some kind of jam after the first few layers? The most frequent cause of jams is either printing too fast for the temperature you're set at, or trying to print at too cold a temperature.

I would try printing at 60mm/sec and bump your temp to around 200C and see how that goes.

g.
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby kuper » Sat Aug 04, 2018 7:47 pm

geneb wrote:"the heat break stuck" doesn't really make any sense to me. I'm assuming you're getting some kind of jam after the first few layers? The most frequent cause of jams is either printing too fast for the temperature you're set at, or trying to print at too cold a temperature.

I would try printing at 60mm/sec and bump your temp to around 200C and see how that goes.

g.


after replacing the new nozzle and set the temp to 190c I am printing a couple of hours, the jam created slowly during the printing.
I tried to print with different temps but the result is the same.
you suggest printing at 60mm/sec how can I configure that??

thanks.

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Re: heat break stuck

Postby geneb » Sun Aug 05, 2018 9:02 am

Look at the speed settings for Cura. Are you using one of the SE300 configuration profiles from SeeMeCNC's git repo?

This may help: http://download.seemecnc.com/SeeMeCNC%2 ... 0Guide.pdf

g.
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby kuper » Mon Aug 06, 2018 2:35 am

geneb wrote:Look at the speed settings for Cura. Are you using one of the SE300 configuration profiles from SeeMeCNC's git repo?

This may help: http://download.seemecnc.com/SeeMeCNC%2 ... 0Guide.pdf

g.


yes, I'm using a SE300 slicing profile, I checked the speed and is set to 60 mm/s when the jam was created.
what else can I do? reduce the speed?

thanks.

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Re: heat break stuck

Postby geneb » Mon Aug 06, 2018 9:11 am

Try increasing the printing temp around 5 degrees and see how that goes.

g.
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby kuper » Sat Aug 18, 2018 11:05 am

I tried to print at 190,200,210 degrees and tried to reduce print speed to 50mm/s the result is the same after some time during printing the PLA leak thru the heat block and nozzle thread (like in photos).

thanks for the help.

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Re: heat break stuck

Postby Xenocrates » Sat Aug 18, 2018 8:04 pm

That is potentially due to debris on the end of the heat break or nozzle preventing the two from butting together tightly, or possibly just them not being torqued together well. The two should create a metal on metal seal, preventing any molten plastic from escaping.
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby rootboy » Mon Aug 20, 2018 1:14 am

Silly question, but is your hotend fan working?

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Re: heat break stuck

Postby 626Pilot » Mon Aug 20, 2018 7:08 pm

I'm not familiar with this hot end, but it looks like plastic is oozing out of the threaded hole where the heat break screws into the heat block. This is most likely because the nozzle wasn't tightened with the hot end at the right temperature, or there is some crud in the nozzle, or both. (Some of these filament vendors ship plastic that has gritty crap in it.)

This is what I would do, and which you can also do at your own risk:

  • Get some good leather gloves, and a couple of pliers or small Vice Grips. I like to use channel locks with insulated grips that can withstand high temperatures. If you have a screwdriver with a socket that will perfectly fit your hot end nozzle, that can replace one of the pliers, and will make things marginally easier. You will also need a blowtorch (for PLA). Also, a short length of stranded wire, or some PCB drill bits that are less wide than the nozzle opening. (The wire will do fine.) Optionally, some cleaning filament.
  • Read the manual that came with the hot end. There should be a section in which you are instructed to raise the hot end temperature to something well above normal operating temperature, perhaps 250C for example. It really depends on the manufacturer. Too hot can cause damage, and not hot enough will yield a bad result, so make sure you get this number correct! I will call this the "installation temperature," as opposed to the much lower "operating temperature" you would normally run it at.
  • Bring the hot end up to installation temperature.
  • Grip the hot end with one set of pliers, and the nozzle with the other set (or with your screwdriver/socket). Without allowing the hot end to rotate (which would be bad for the wires), gently unscrew and remove the nozzle.
  • Shut off the printer.
  • For PLA, take the nozzle outside and blowtorch it. (This assumes it's brass or steel. Aluminum will warp badly at blowtorch temperatures and become useless, but I don't think anyone is shipping aluminum nozzles.) For any other plastic... that's a whole other thread... blowtorching is useless against ABS, and I don't think it works on PETG either. Different plastics probably need to be immersed in some chemical that eats them away, which is a whole big thing I don't want to get into here.
  • After the PLA has been reduced to ash (a few minutes at most), peel a single strand off the copper wire and use it to clear out any crud that might be in the nozzle. You can use PCB drill bits instead if the diameter is low enough, but be very careful: if you gouge or mar any surface, inside or out, you may permanently wreck the nozzle. The nozzle opening, when held to a light source, should show perfectly, flawlessly round.
  • Set aside the nozzle. Do not reinstall it yet.
  • Bring the hot end up to operating (not installation) temperature. Use a toothpick and some paper towels to remove any plastic you can get at from the bottom of the hot end, where the nozzle would normally screw in. Run some cleaning filament through after that, and get any of it that's left behind.
  • Shut off the printer, and as quickly and carefully as possible, disassemble the heater block from the heat break. Remove the heat break from whatever it screws into. Do not let the hot end wires get tweaked or bent.
  • Remove as much still-warm plastic from the heater block and heat break as you can before it cools. After it's cool, you can use some edge cutters to get the rest, but be careful: you DON'T want to gouge or mar any surface of anything. If in doubt, apply heat and try again. (But not from a blowtorch. Hot end heater blocks are usually aluminum. Blowtorch temperatures will ruin them.)
  • Screw the heat break, heater block, and nozzle back together when everything is cold. Follow the manufacturer's recommendation for how far the nozzle flange should be from the heater block.
  • Bring the heater block up to installation temperature and finish tightening per manufacturer's instructions.
  • Reduce heat to operating temperature and run some filament through. It should not ooze, and unless the temperature is wrong for that kind of PLA, or the nozzle flange is the wrong distance from the heater block, it should not jam either. As the heat comes down to operating temperature, the metal fittings will all tighten together. Your rebuild is done.
Good luck.

kuper
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby kuper » Tue Aug 28, 2018 8:24 am

rootboy wrote:Silly question, but is your hotend fan working?


yes, all fans are working.

626Pilot wrote:I'm not familiar with this hot end, but it looks like plastic is oozing out of the threaded hole where the heat break screws into the heat block. This is most likely because the nozzle wasn't tightened with the hot end at the right temperature, or there is some crud in the nozzle, or both. (Some of these filament vendors ship plastic that has gritty crap in it.)

This is what I would do, and which you can also do at your own risk:

  • Get some good leather gloves, and a couple of pliers or small Vice Grips. I like to use channel locks with insulated grips that can withstand high temperatures. If you have a screwdriver with a socket that will perfectly fit your hot end nozzle, that can replace one of the pliers, and will make things marginally easier. You will also need a blowtorch (for PLA). Also, a short length of stranded wire, or some PCB drill bits that are less wide than the nozzle opening. (The wire will do fine.) Optionally, some cleaning filament.
  • Read the manual that came with the hot end. There should be a section in which you are instructed to raise the hot end temperature to something well above normal operating temperature, perhaps 250C for example. It really depends on the manufacturer. Too hot can cause damage, and not hot enough will yield a bad result, so make sure you get this number correct! I will call this the "installation temperature," as opposed to the much lower "operating temperature" you would normally run it at.
  • Bring the hot end up to installation temperature.
  • Grip the hot end with one set of pliers, and the nozzle with the other set (or with your screwdriver/socket). Without allowing the hot end to rotate (which would be bad for the wires), gently unscrew and remove the nozzle.
  • Shut off the printer.
  • For PLA, take the nozzle outside and blowtorch it. (This assumes it's brass or steel. Aluminum will warp badly at blowtorch temperatures and become useless, but I don't think anyone is shipping aluminum nozzles.) For any other plastic... that's a whole other thread... blowtorching is useless against ABS, and I don't think it works on PETG either. Different plastics probably need to be immersed in some chemical that eats them away, which is a whole big thing I don't want to get into here.
  • After the PLA has been reduced to ash (a few minutes at most), peel a single strand off the copper wire and use it to clear out any crud that might be in the nozzle. You can use PCB drill bits instead if the diameter is low enough, but be very careful: if you gouge or mar any surface, inside or out, you may permanently wreck the nozzle. The nozzle opening, when held to a light source, should show perfectly, flawlessly round.
  • Set aside the nozzle. Do not reinstall it yet.
  • Bring the hot end up to operating (not installation) temperature. Use a toothpick and some paper towels to remove any plastic you can get at from the bottom of the hot end, where the nozzle would normally screw in. Run some cleaning filament through after that, and get any of it that's left behind.
  • Shut off the printer, and as quickly and carefully as possible, disassemble the heater block from the heat break. Remove the heat break from whatever it screws into. Do not let the hot end wires get tweaked or bent.
  • Remove as much still-warm plastic from the heater block and heat break as you can before it cools. After it's cool, you can use some edge cutters to get the rest, but be careful: you DON'T want to gouge or mar any surface of anything. If in doubt, apply heat and try again. (But not from a blowtorch. Hot end heater blocks are usually aluminum. Blowtorch temperatures will ruin them.)
  • Screw the heat break, heater block, and nozzle back together when everything is cold. Follow the manufacturer's recommendation for how far the nozzle flange should be from the heater block.
  • Bring the heater block up to installation temperature and finish tightening per manufacturer's instructions.
  • Reduce heat to operating temperature and run some filament through. It should not ooze, and unless the temperature is wrong for that kind of PLA, or the nozzle flange is the wrong distance from the heater block, it should not jam either. As the heat comes down to operating temperature, the metal fittings will all tighten together. Your rebuild is done.
Good luck.


I didn't find the "installation temperature" in the guides and the manual.
I disassemble all the hotend parts and clean them on a gas plate(heat break, heat block), I cleaned the nozzle with a needle and checked the hole.
I assemble all the parts tight. I checked if the filament goes thru the hotend smoothy and connected the hotend to the printer. everything looks good.

https://ibb.co/mftqHp

but it leak agian

https://ibb.co/i8j83U

I tried a different nozzle shorter one it leaks also...
https://ibb.co/g8T7xp
https://ibb.co/b7mGq9

thanks.

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Re: heat break stuck

Postby Mac The Knife » Tue Aug 28, 2018 12:09 pm

warm the hotend to around 200 C, then re tighten the nozzle before you print.
the aluminum heat block expands more than the nozzle, and heat break, which causes the nozzle to loosen and leak.
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Re: heat break stuck

Postby Windshadow » Wed Aug 29, 2018 11:57 am

I think from your photos you have reached the point where defective parts might be the cause... try replacing them both with another pair from a quality provider (ie not from bang good)


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